Category

Plants

Outings, Plants

Big Creek Wildflower Walk

Wildflower photos  by Allen Miller

 

Our first field trip of the year drew seventeen BRNN members to view wildflowers on a mild, damp morning at Big Creek on the eastern edge of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.  We split into two groups, one taking the wide Big Creek trail that runs straight along the north side of the valley, the other crossing the creek to take the Baxter Creek trail that runs south towards Mt. Sterling.  We found a total of 55 flowering plants, shrubs and trees without stepping off the trails.  The Yellow Trillium was everywhere, with Purple Phacelia, Long-spurred  Violet, and Foam Flower making fine shows.  Members new to the area were delighted to discover Showy Orchis, Wild Ginger, and Yellow Mandarin, and more experienced wildflower enthusiasts got a chance to distinguish Golden Alexanders from Smooth Meadow Parsnip.  Scott Dean would have been proud of us!     Read more

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Insects, Outings, Plants

Citizen scientists needed

LAND SNAILS AND MILLIPEDES

Looking for a final project for your BRN certification? Hands on the Land (www.handsontheland.org) and the GSMNP need citizen scientists to survey snails and millipedes along the BRP from April through June this year. This is an activity that should appeal to BRNN members – we all love creepy-crawlies, don’t we?

Volunteer to recruit BRNN members (and others), organize the recruits into a team, with car-pooling and other ways to enhance participation, and it could be your graduation project. No prior knowledge of snails required.

Contact Charlotte Caplan – BRNNetwork2013@gmail.com – for more information, before the end of February.

UPDATE from Charlotte:

Here are the details I’ve received for the training on Saturday, April 8:

“The training event will be held at the Blue Ridge Parkway Visitor Center on April 8th from 9am until 3pm. Make sure to bring your lunch and expect to get a little dirty since you will get some collection experience. You will pick up some collecting supplies at the training event.

The VC is located at milepost 384
199 Hemphill Knob Rd 

Asheville, NC 28803

There’s also some more information on the website so have a look at the how to collect section and this will give you an idea about the procedure. More information will be updated soon.”


SAVE THE HEMLOCKS

If you have been looking for ways to get involved in hemlock conservation we’ve got some opportunities for you!
The Hemlock Restoration Initiative holding a volunteer workday with their partner the Forest Restoration Alliance April 13  from 9am to 4pm at the Mountain Research Station in Waynesville.
Here is a link to description of the workday on our website: http://savehemlocksnc.org/upcoming-events/
If you think you’d like to attend please RSVP ASAP for details.

This will be a horticulturally focused day where volunteers will work in the FRA greenhouse, helping out with transplanting, tagging and caring for some particularly valuable hemlock seedlings. We may also engage in some other light gardening work but NO CHEMICALS INVOLVED!

If you have any questions about the Hemlock Restoration Initiative (HRI), the Forest Restoration Alliance (FRA) or the work we do please feel free to reach out.

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO JOIN US ON THURSDAY 4/13  PLEASE RSVP
Sara deFossett at info@savehemlocksnc.org

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March 21, 2017

You won’t want to miss our next meeting!

“Wildflowers of the Blue Ridge” presented by local naturalist and photographer, Scott Dean, will be held at the West Asheville Library on Tuesday, March 21, 2017 from 5:30-7:00.

Scott will give us a head start on our spring wildflower season with photographs and discussions of how the season affects their growth and life cycle, reproductive strategies and a lot of folklore associated with them.


—Photo, Glass Wildflowers: Shooting Stars, Iris, and Monarda courtesy of Scott Dean

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